Hurricane Ida: Update for Louisiana and Mississippi p.m. Friday 27 August 2021

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  • Hurricane Warning for the Louisiana Coast including New Orleans
  • Hurricane Watch for the Mississippi Coastline
  • Storm Surge Warning for much of the Louisiana and Mississippi Coast
  • Tropical Storm Warning for the Mississippi Coastline

As of Friday evening, Hurricane Ida was 985 miles southeast of New Orleans LA, moving to the northwest at 15 mph. Maximum sustained winds are 80 mph. Ida will likely rapidly intensify over the weekend and reach the Louisiana coast with winds well in excess of 100 mph.

Ida will likely make landfall on the southeast LA coast, probably due south of Baton Rouge, Sunday evening. This puts much of southeast Louisiana, including New Orleans, along with the MS coast west of Gulfport at risk for a major hurricane on Sunday afternoon through Monday morning.

Winds just to the east of Ida at landfall could reach 140 mph with a 10-15 foot storm surge along the LA coast. The MS coast should be prepared for hurricane force winds and a 7-11 foot storm surge. The surge could reach 4-7 feet in Lake Pontchartrain and in the Slidell LA region. Ida will likely spawn short-lived but numerous tornadoes in its northeastern quadrant once it makes landfall.

Needless to say, Ida is a powerful and dangerous storm. You should not be near the beaches or coastal bayous in LA or MS. Be alert for freshwater flooding as well. If at all possible, move away from the coast. Please follow the evacuation orders of your local emergency management officials. If you are evacuating, be prepared for the trip away from the coast to take many more hours than it would under normal conditions. You need to complete your storm / evacuation preparations by Saturday night.

If you are RV’ing in the lower Mississippi River Valley or Tennessee River Valley, be prepared for heavy rains and flash flooding, very gusty winds and the possibility of brief tornadoes Monday and Tuesday. Be very cautious if your campsite is near a stream, small river or lake that may rise rapidly. Have a plan to get yourself to higher ground.

As always, please monitor the National Hurricane Center forecasts, either directly from their website, through local TV stations, or reputable, established weather websites.

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